Individual Details

Roger Williams

(21 Dec 1602 - 1 Apr 1683)

Roger Williams was born in Smithfield, Greater London, England on December 21 1602. He was raised in a religious family, educated at Cambridge and convinced that 1600 English religion was doomed because of it's fakeness and corruption. He married Mary Barnard, maybe after being unable to marry his true love. They took up residence in Salem Massachusetts in 1634 with the promise of religious freedom. Quickly Roger saw flaws in the set up. He was most upset that the colonial government was using the guise of religion to take land from the native tribes. Roger's idea was to live peacefully and respectfully with the natives, he wrote Key to the Language to facilitate this arrangement. Pretty quick, Roger was banished from Massachusetts. He escaped in the night with John the miller Smith and Thomas Angell and a couple others- they named their new home Providence.

Events

Birth21 Dec 1602Smithfield, Greater London, England - London, England
Marriage15 Dec 1629England - Mary Barnard
Civil19 Oct 1630Freeman - Massachuetts Bay Colony, Massachusetts, United States
Arrival1631on the Lyon - Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Civil1634Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, United States
Civil8 Oct 1635Banished
Residence1636Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Civil1637Providence Civil Compact - Providence, Rhode Island, United States
Civil27 Jul 1640Signer of Providence agreement
Death1 Apr 1683Providence, Rhode Island, United States
OccupationPastor, Founder of the First Baptist Church - Providence, Rhode Island, United States
BurialProvidence, Rhode Island, United States
OccupationAuthor, linguistic anthropologist
OccupationFounder of Rhode Island

Families

SpouseMary Barnard (1609 - 1676)
ChildMary Williams (1633 - 1681)
ChildFreeborn Williams (1635 - 1710)
ChildProvidence Williams (1638 - 1686)
ChildMercy Williams (1640 - 1705)
ChildDaniel Williams (1641 - 1712)
ChildJoseph Williams (1643 - 1724)
FatherJames Williams ( - )
MotherAlice Pemberton ( - )

Notes

Endnotes